Explore Port Protection with the Area's Only Charter Operation


Featured in the National Geographic Channel show Port Protection, this remote outpost on Wooden Wheel Cove on the northwestern coast of Prince of Wales Island lies only minutes from some of the most productive fishing anywhere in Alaska — not just for salmon, but also for monster lingcod, halibut, and yelloweye rockfish.

Each August, we move our boats and gear more than 100 miles by water from Craig to Port Protection — accessible only by boat or float plane — to offer the only charter fishing available in the area. It's not easy, but the opportunity to share the experience of fishing these pristine waters with our clients and friends is more than worth the trouble.

 

Fishing Port Protection

August, when we're fishing out of Port Protection, is the peak of the silver (or coho) salmon run. But that's only part of the story. Because bottom species are less migratory than salmon, their numbers and size in a given area are much more easily affected by fishing pressure. That means the bottom fishing out of Port Protection, which experiences only a tiny fraction of the pressure of more established destinations, is truly exceptional, with abundant halibut, yelloweye rockfish and especially gargantuan lingcod.

The remoteness of the area also brings its challenges. There is no easy way to replace gear or get equipment repaired, so we not only make sure our boats are in top shape before making the trip, but also take spares of nearly everything — rods and tackle, fish processing tools and supplies, even gear like downriggers and kicker motors. Simply put, equipment failure will not affect your trip.

Because Underdog Sportfishing holds a NOAA-issued Halibut Charter Permit, you may retain halibut according to the year's charter angler halibut regulations.

We also participate in the GAF (Guided Angler Fish) program. In simple terms, this allows us to acquire for our clients some of the catch share allocated for commercial fishing. Currently, the GAF program offers you the exciting opportunity to harvest two halibut per day of any size until our GAF quote is depleted. Please see our Details page for further information.


Short Runs and Pristine Waters

One of our favorite things about fishing Port Protection is that we can spend all day with our lines in the water. We sometimes fish as little as 5 to 10 minutes from our dock and rarely more than 30 minutes. We can also fish our protected waters in virtually any weather.

The only reason we run farther than 20 minutes or so is to visit the virtually untouched waters around Kuiu Island, just across Sumner Strait. At nearly 750 square miles, Kuiu is the 15th-largest island in the United States yet home to less than a dozen humans.

The southern portion, which we visit, is inhabited only by black bears (one of the world's densest populations), plus wolves, numerous smaller mammals like beaver and mink, sea otters, sea lions, seals, and whales. The fishing is equally pristine, with hundreds of miles of coves, islands, and points, many of which have never before been fished with rod and reel.


Port Protection Lodging and Meals

At Port Protection, we stay in a small complex of three waterfront cabins with a dock. One sleeps 3, another sleeps 8, and the last is occupied by captains and staff. The cabins are fully furnished with modern amenities including satellite TV, wi-fi, cellular service, and independent thermostats.

Because all supplies are flown in, fresh local seafood figures heavily in the menu — a variety of fish plus prawns, razor clams, dungeness crab, and more. Meals are cooked and served by Mary Miller, a favorite personality on the National Geographic show.


Trip Details

Port Protection trips are complete packages from 4 nights/3 days to 7 nights/6 days packages that include lodging and meals, private charter boats, professional guides, rain gear, boots, unlimited fish processing, and ground transportation.

Please visit our Details page for pricing and additional information.

Typically, you'll arrive the evening before you fish, wash away the trip with a cocktail and some fresh local seafood, get a good night's rest, and then spend the next three or more days battling the biggest salmon and halibut on the planet. Departure is the morning after your last fishing day.